jueves, 25 de julio de 2019

Is the grain of French oak wood the key factor of the OTR?


Influence of Quercus petraea Liebl. wood structure on the permeation of oxygen through wine barrel staves

Ignacio Nevares, Maria del Alamo-Sanza, Víctor Martínez-Martínez,  María Menéndez-Miguélez, Jan Van den Bulcke and Joris Van Acker
Wood Research amd Technology. Holzforschung
Published Online: 2019-05-24 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/hf-2018-0299

Abstract

The anatomical characteristics of oak wood, which is usually employed for making wine barrels, affect the properties of the wine, because these characteristics are related to the chemical compounds that can be potentially transferred to wine during the aging process. Grain, as the rate of tree growth, is the most commonly employed parameter to define the quality of the oak wood used in cooperage. Nevertheless, oxygen is a key factor in this process and there are few articles that evaluate the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of the wood employed in cooperage. This work presents the evaluation of the anatomical characteristics of the French oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.) measured with X-ray computed tomography and the OTR of 267 wood samples extracted from recently constructed wine barrels. This study demonstrates that the OTR is dependent on the anatomical features of oak wood, the first step to classify a natural material as wood for custom oxygenation barrel making. OTR cannot be determined from the wood grain or any other single property because it depends on the overall anatomical characteristics of each wood sample, the grain and the average earlywood and latewood width being the three parameters with a stronger correlation with the OTR

martes, 2 de julio de 2019

A novel nondestructive methodology is proposed to make barrels with different levels of OTR

Application of image analysis and artificial neural networks to the prediction in-line of OTR in oak wood planks for cooperage

lunes, 27 de mayo de 2019

Oak in Winemaking Symposium



70th ASEV National Conference



This symposium is designed to explore the impacts of using oak barrels on the quality and composition of wine. The symposium is designed to address the fundamental aspects of coopering, oak chemistry, and barrel aging of wine. Specifically, this symposium will focus on how barrels are made, which types of wood are selected and how new species or genera are being investigated to understand their unique properties, as well as a review of barrel chemistry and its effects on wine composition. The event will include a tour of cooperages due to the close proximity of multiple cooperages in the Napa Valley. A tasting will also be provided highlighting the effects of using oak barrels on red wine composition during primary fermentation and aging.
Symposium Chair: Tom Collins, Washington State University, Tri-Cities

Program:

Program is subject to change.
7:15 am – 8:45 am Cooperage Tours:
9:15 am – 10:00 am Speaker To Be Determined
10:00 am – 10:45 am Oak Quality Considerations and Options for American Oak Barrels
Anthony Morris, Canton Cooperage, Kentucky
10:45 am – 11:00 am Break
11:00 am – 11:45 am Impact of Variability in the Toasting Process on Composition of Oak Barrels
Tom Collins, Washington State University, Tri-Cities
11: 45 am – 12:30 pm Barrel Chemistry and Its Effect on Wine and Spirit Composition: Lignin, Cellulose, and Sugars
Jarrad Gollihue, University of Kentucky, Lexington
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch (on own)
1:30 pm – 2:15 pm How Oak Barrels Can Influence the Taste of Wine: Current Knowledge and Recent Acquisitions
Delphine Winstel, Université de Bordeaux, France
2:15 pm – 3:15 pm Tank or Barrel? The Impact of Fermentation and Aging Red Wine in Stainless Steel Tanks and Oak Barrels
(Tasting of experimental red wines fermented and aged in various combinations of oak barrels and stainless vessels.)
Scott Frost, Washington State University, Tri-Cities
3:15 pm – 3:30 pm Break
3:30 pm – 4:15 pm Recent Advances in Barrel and Oxygen                                                     Ignacio Nevares&María del Alamo                                UVaMOX-Universidad de Valladolid, Spain
4:15 pm – 4:45 pm Q&A and Closing Remarks
Tom Collins, Washington State University, Tri-Cities


martes, 26 de marzo de 2019

UVaMOX en el XVIII Congreso Nacional de Enólogos

http://www.federacionenologos.es/congreso-enologos/

XVIII Congreso Nacional de Enólogos

&

II Encuentro de Enólogos de Iberoamerica

Palencia, Castilla y León, 4-6 de abril de 2019

El próximo 5 de abril, UVaMOX es la encargada de realizar la conferencia inaugural de la mano de su coordinadora. El XVIII Congreso Nacional de Enólogos y el II Encuentro de Enólogos de Iberamérica, reunirá en Palencia a más de 300 expertos de España, Portugal e Iberoamérica para abordar las últimas investigaciones en el ámbito de la vitivinicultura y debatir los retos actuales de la profesión


VIERNES 5 DE ABRIL DE 2019

9.00-9.45: CONFERENCIA INAGURAL: “Gestión del oxígeno en la maduración de vinos. Avances y situación actual”. MARIA DEL ÁLAMO SANZA. (UVa y ACLE)
Programa completo: AQUÍ

miércoles, 27 de febrero de 2019

Latest Research on Oxygen and Wine Barrels (in mostly plain English)

You know oxygen is an important part of the winemaking process, but that doesn’t mean you always know how to manage or control it.

 

by Deborah Passin

 

Oxygen can do wonderful things for a wine, aiding in the development of more complex flavors and improving mouthfeel. But oxygen can also be your wine's worst enemy.


Full article here and here

Three Important Questions to Ask

#1 HOW DOES OXYGEN GET IN?
#2 HOW MUCH OXYGEN COMES IN?
#3 WHEN DOES OXYGEN COME IN?

martes, 12 de febrero de 2019

UVaMOX gana el 1er premio Desafío Universidad-Empresa junto con Vega Sicilia

La Consejería de Educación -a través de la Fundación Universidades y Enseñanzas Superiores de Castilla y León (FUESCYL)-, ha publicado la relación de ganadores de la edición de 2018 de los concursos ‘Desafío Universidad–Empresa’ e ‘Iniciativa Campus Emprendedor’, ambos certámenes integrados en el Plan de Transferencia de Conocimiento Universidad–Empresa (Plan TCUE) que impulsa la Junta de Castilla y León a través de la Consejería de Educación

El primer premio de la 6ª edición del concurso Desafio Universidad Empresa ha recaído en la solución presentada por María del Álamo Sanza, del Grupo de Investigación UVaMOX, con sede en la Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenierías Agrarias del Campus de Palencia de la Universidad de Valladolid, en respuesta a un reto planteado por la empresa Bodegas Vega Sicilia S.A., relativo al control del oxígeno durante el proceso de crianza del vino.



martes, 1 de enero de 2019

Image of O2 dynamics released by oak wood submerged in model wine with nanoparticle sensors


Samanta Prat-Garcíaa, VíctorMartínez-Martíneza, Maria del Alamo-Sanzaa, Bernhard Müllerb, TorstenMayrb and IgnacioNevaresa
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2018.12.131


Oxidation of wine while in contact with oak wood is a well-known fact and recognized as an important process in wine ageing. The slow and continuous diffusion of oxygen from the oak wood entrapped in its porosity occurs and encourages the reactions usually related with wine aging. In this work, oxygen sensitive particles were used to study the oxygen dynamics from different anatomical regions of the oak wood and simultaneously the oxygen increasement because of the deoxygenation of the wood and the oxygen depletion due to its consumption by the tannins and other compounds released from the wood. To this end, core-shell-type PSPVP nanoparticles stained with Macrolex Fluorescence Yellow and Pt-TFPP were employed as reference and oxygen-sensitive particles respectively. Moreover, a Guppy Pro RGB camera was employed to monitor the particles performing ratiometric oxygen imaging, using the green and red channels to acquire the light emitted from the reference and the oxygen-sensitive particles respectively. Because the volume of nanosensors corresponding to each surface unit is very different from that of the wood region, different exposure times were chosen to obtain the images at each of the times. The results show the wood degassing process during the first minutes of the experiment, the oxygen release from different structural elements of the wood, its consumption by the released compounds from wood and the diffusion of the oxygen through the model wine.